Download e-book Feeding Baby: A Definitive Guide to the Science and Wisdom of Infant Feeding Choices

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DNF, and it was the edition if that makes any difference. One part mommy-shaming, one part pseudoscientific crap, and two parts informercial for La Leche League, this book made me so angry I almost cracked my Kindle's screen removing it. I'm as pro-breastfeeding as the next woman, but the author of this book seems to delight in making up her own facts. No, your baby will not become an emotionally stunted, developmentally disabled diabetic if you find yourself in a situation where you have to DNF, and it was the edition if that makes any difference.

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No, your baby will not become an emotionally stunted, developmentally disabled diabetic if you find yourself in a situation where you have to use formula. No, your baby will not be ruined forever if you require interventions during childbirth.

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I have to say, never before have I been told I need to worry about not bonding with my baby if she should happen to glance at someone else other than me immediately after she's born. And no, breastfeeding will not be as easy as breathing if you can just quit thinking about your own health and safety long enough to have the perfect, all-natural childbirth.

And I say all this as a pregnant, attachment parenting stay-at-home-mom who plans to have an all-natural childbirth and exclusively breastfeed. But FFS, the shaming has got to stop and this book seems to be ground zero for the mommy wars.


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I thought the lactivists online were bad, but these LLL women take it to a whole new level of scathing judgement. If you're looking for science-based, shame-free facts about how to breastfeed and why you should consider giving it a whirl if you can, toss this in a dumpster preferably one that's on fire at the moment and look elsewhere. Sep 26, Cori rated it liked it. This book is great for the woman already determined to breastfeed, however I worry that a woman on the fence or that is struggling with negative feelings towards breastfeeding, might be put off by the overly positive portrayal of breastfeeding.

I've exclusively breastfed two children, for me every moment was a struggle but a worthy one. I will strongly encourage my future childbirth students to breastfeed I This book is great for the woman already determined to breastfeed, however I worry that a woman on the fence or that is struggling with negative feelings towards breastfeeding, might be put off by the overly positive portrayal of breastfeeding. I've definitely experienced the "nursing high" but I've also experienced low milk supply due to polycystic ovary syndrome and disphoric milk ejection response, two breastfeeding complications not addressed, and I wonder if that's because it's difficult to but a glowy spin on them.

Breastfeeding is hard sometimes, sometimes it sucks, but it is what is best and denying that reality hurts this book's credibility with the women who are privy to the other side. I found the chapter on working mothers especially disappointing, offering some tips in the beginning, but wrapping it up with "success stories" of women who chose to leave their careers for their children.

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This is not much different from formulas who offer breastfeeding advice and wrap it up with their own agenda. Jun 10, Echo rated it liked it. This book has a lot of valuable information in it if you are, or would like to, breastfeed. I cheered when I got through the last page.

Do what you will with it. Hilariously, both methods actually are close to the same, once you get past the terminology. Too much of the book is spent attacking PDF the breastfeeding philosophy, not the portable document format and talking about how kick-ass FOD is. I just noticed that I seem to be the only male who reviewed this book.

Weird, huh? Nov 29, Deborah rated it it was ok. I wish I could have given this book a better review, but it has problems that many others have already pointed out, and one that nobody else has mentioned: Not everyone is able to breastfeed. Many women need to return to work immediately, particularly in our post-meltdown economy, and do not have supportive workplaces where pumping is possible. Some women have biological issues that prevent their children from breastfeeding, despite endless endless consultations with lactation experts, weeks on I wish I could have given this book a better review, but it has problems that many others have already pointed out, and one that nobody else has mentioned: Not everyone is able to breastfeed.

Some women have biological issues that prevent their children from breastfeeding, despite endless endless consultations with lactation experts, weeks on medication to keep their milk production up, and endless hours applying peristaltic pumps to their nipples.

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Few would deny the benefits of breastfeeding in this enlightened time, yet breastfeeding activists are far too quick to judge those mothers who are forced by their circumstances to make a less-optimal choice. Inability to breastfeed despite the best intentions and greatest efforts has been a factor in the postnatal depression of more than one of my friends.

We could all be a little more understanding. Mar 31, Amanda Fields added it. Let's start with the good: this book has many useful tips about breastfeeding, from pumping to the benefits to understanding the reproductive cycle while breastfeeding. It's obviously pro-breastfeeding and offers numerous ways for women committed to breastfeeding to address problems that may arise. I recommend it for these practical reasons. Now for the not-so-good: I've read lots of pregnancy books over the last 8 months.

Often I read reviews of these books that detect a condescending tone e. I haven't found any of these books to be particularly condescending, though most of them Our Bodies, Ourselves is an exception assume traditional gender roles in a household, which is annoying, and most have a pretty clear agenda. Or, more aptly, the book assumes too much. This was published in , and the book assumes that I'm going to be waiting for my husband to come home at 5pm so I can get a little rest, and that I'm going to have to educate my husband about how to be an understanding and loving father.

They suggest that I should wait as long as possible to go back to work, as if the majority of American women have that luxury in one of the worst parental leave contexts in the world. One personal example from the book is from a wife whose husband lost interest in the baby because babies "don't do anything. If my husband did that, I'd throw his ass to the curb before he could complete the sentence.

Yet the example is presented as if it's something others will have experienced. Maybe I'm too idealistic and I expect more from my partner than other women, but I doubt it. I don't think any woman should have to even bother convincing a male partner that he should be as invested in caregiving as she is. Overall, the book needs to be updated for tone and an acknowledgment of the diverse reality of families and gender identities.

There is a glaring lack of acknowledgment for families that do not consist of a husband and wife, or even families that consist of partners who do everything they can because they want to to participate equally in the development of their children. Sep 13, Meghan rated it really liked it. This is an excellent resource for anyone wishing to breastfeed. Despite LLL's reputation for being militant when it comes to the "breast is best" philosophy, I didn't find the book to be overly dogmatic or off-putting in any way.

Excellent troubleshooting section. Oct 31, Kristin Dennison rated it it was amazing. An incredibly thorough book that covers just about everything you need to know about breastfeeding! I don't know what else to say about it, other than if you are expecting a baby, this is a must-have for your bookshelf!

It will help prepare you well, and will no doubt be an incredibly valuable reference. I want to address some concerns other reviewers have made. There is ABUNDANT information about how to pump, as well as how to make breastfeeding and pumping succeed during the separation caused by a working mother. TONS of information. I truly can't fathom what information may have been left out, or how they could have been more thorough.

ISBN 13: 9781456883157

This makes perfectly logical sense and is a very reasonable approach- although obviously some individuals will be offended by this perspective. That is a personal problem, not a bias of information or fact. Similarly, the "bias" people perceive about how information for working mothers is portrayed.

It is the biological norm for babies to breastfeed and have access round the clock to their mother's breasts for nutrition and comfort. This does not mean working mothers are sub par. It's just a fact that from their baby's standpoint, and the physiology of breastfeeding, they are at a disadvantage. Therefore, much of the advice is centered around how to reach the biological norm in ways that meets the mother's need to work, or how to mimic the biological norm as best as possible.

It would do women and babies a huge disservice to ignore the biology of it all and just say "good for you, going back to work! Of course a working mother is just as good a parent as a stay at home mother, all else equal. But we need to acknowledge the drawbacks of working mothers especially in terms of a successful breastfeeding relationship.

Of course it is possible to work and carry on a healthy, long term, breastfeeding relationship! But since it is not the biological norm, it is challenging.

And that is because working mothers are not ideal, from a purely biological standpoint. There is absolutely nothing wrong in recognizing and saying this. It is not a guilt trip. It is a fact. If YOU perceive it to be a judgement on the quality of your parenting, then perhaps you have some underlying hangups. Being less than ideal biologically doesn't mean "bad parent". It also doesn't mean the book is sexist or biased. Jan 07, Mina Villalobos rated it it was ok Shelves: parenting , not-finished. I began reading this book about a month before my baby was born.

I never finished it before the birth, and after the birth I was usually reading on my phone while I breastfed, and if I had doubts or questions I looked them up online kellymom. Handling an actual physical book while trying to feed the baby just didn't work for me, so that's one reason I didn't give this as much use as I thought I would.

The other reason is that, though I definitely agree that So Like, look. You are in the hospital. Perhaps, like me, you ended up having a c-section after labor failed to progress and there was fetal distress and you cried because this was not what you wanted and maybe no one was on board with the whole breast crawl in the operating room and maybe you were exhausted and in pain because you are resistant to painkillers and you are trying to have the baby latch and he just doesn't know how and you don't know how because for all the photos and youtube videos in the world you have only two hands and how exactly do you cup your breast with the c-hold and bring your baby to the breast while keeping his mouth open and positioning and all that shit that later comes super easy?

And you cry. And the nurse asks if you want a bottle of formula. You know what? Yes yes nipple confusion and colostrum and all that. My milk didn't come in for about a day and a half and I was offering the baby the breast so if there was colostrum coming out he was having it, but it was also sweltering hot and I kept going through water bottles and this tiny human was having only drops of liquid. I was going mad. In part, with guilt. For offering him a bottle after half an hour of clumsy breast latching. I wasn't lazy.